New Zealand

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New Zealand Flag

Prepared by: Greg Blood, Emeritus Researcher, Australian Institute of Sport (June 2016)
Updated by: Greg Blood (September 2016)
Review by network: International Association for Sports Information (IASI)
Scheduled Release: August 2016 

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Index of content:

Introduction

New Zealand has sent athletes to compete in every Summer Olympic Games since 1908. For its first two Games, in 1908 and 1912, New Zealand competed with Australia in a combined Australasia team. New Zealand first sent an independent team in 1920. (Wikipedia 2016)

Table 1: Key national performance metrics - New Zealand

Population Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Summer Olympic
Gold Medal Ranking (2016)

Winter Olympic 
Gold Medal Ranking (2014)
Summer Paralympic Gold Medal Ranking (2016) Winter Paralympic Gold Medal Ranking (2014)
4.5 million 139.8 billion USD (2010) 19th - 13th

 15th



Sport structure and governance

Government

Structure 

  • Diagram of Structure of New Zealand Sport
  • The New Zealand sport system consists a combination of national and local government, non-profit and commercial organisations that deliver or provide services to sport.
  • Sport New Zealand (Sport NZ) is the principal Federal Government agency for sport and is supported by 78 local governments.
  • High Performance Sport New Zealand (HPSNZ), a subsidy of Sport New Zealand (established in 2011) leads the high performance sport system in New Zealand.
  • There are 17 Regional Sports Trusts that provide services on behalf of Sport NZ.
  • There are approximately 14,500 sports clubs.

Funding to sport

Table 2: Peak sport funding agencies and total allocations to sport 

Organisation2015/16 

2016/17

2017/18
Ministry of Culture and RecreationNZ$84,239 mNZ$89,195 m NZ$89,195
Primary Allocation
 High PerformanceNZ$58,192 mNZ$62,192 m NZ$62,192
 Sport and Recreation ProgramsNZ$19,151 mNZ$19,151 m NZ$19,151
 Sports Anti DopingNZ$2,239 mNZ$3,239 m NZ$3,239
 Prime Minister's Sport ScholarshipsNZ$4,250 mNZ$4,250 m NZ$4,250 

Source: Sport and Recreation - Treasury Estimates of Appropriations 2017/18]


High performance system 

 Overview

  • Sport in New Zealand relies heavily on Federal and Local Government funding.
  • Sport New Zealand (Sport NZ) is the principal Federal Government agency responsible for sport.
  • High Performance Sport New Zealand (HPSNZ) is an independent subsidiary of Sport NZ and responsible for leading and investing in the national high performance system.
  • Black Gold (a joint venture between the New Zealand Olympic Committee and Sport NZ) targets private investment from some of the most successful and wealthy individuals from New Zealand and around the world to help fund high-performance sport and compliment the Government's investment.
  • HPSNZ has a highly targeted approach to funding National Sporting Organisations (NSOs) with Cycling, Rowing and Yachting (Sailing) being the only sports to receive the highest ‘Tier 1’ funding level during 2013 to 2016.
  • The New Zealand high performance system employs leading international coaches, administrators and sport science/medicine practitioners – a significant number of Australians work in the New Zealand sport system.

High Performance Organisations

Performance Targets

  • Medals at forthcoming Olympic Summer Games: 14 plus medals in Rio 2016; and, 16 plus medals in Tokyo 2020.
  • Medals at Olympic Winter Games: 1 or more medals in Sochi 2014; and, 2 plus medals in Pyeongchang 2018.
  • Gold medals at Paralympic Summer Games: 8 to 12 in Rio 2016.
  • Gold Medals at Paralympic Winter Games: 2plus in Sochi 2014.

 Operating Approach

  • HPSNZ was established in 2011 to lead the high performance sport system in New Zealand. 
  • HPSNZ works in partnership with NSOs and other key high performance sport stakeholders.
  • HPSNZ has a highly targeted approach to funding NSOs using 5 priority funding categories: ‘Tier 1’; ‘Tier 2’; ‘Tier 3;’ ‘Targeted Other’ (i.e. Winter and Paralympics); and, ‘Campaign’ (generally for non-Olympic/non-Paralympic sports).
  • For the four year period 2013-2016, ‘Tier 1’ funded sports include Cycling, Rowing, and Sailing.
  • ‘Tier 1’ and ‘Tier 2’ sports maintain a nominated level of funding for a four year Olympic funding cycle.
  • HPSNZ invests in 7 high performance training centres including two sport specific centres for Rowing and Cycling.
  • HPSNZ operates a ‘Coach Performance Program’ and ‘Innovation Fund’.
  • High Performance Sport New Zealand Strategy 2013-2020 revised September 2012 (PDF)
  • New Zealand High Performance Coaching Plan 2011–2020 (PDF)

Funding to high performance sport  

Table 3: New Zealand high performance sport funding agencies including annual allocations

Organisation2015/16 

2016/17

2017/18
Ministry of Culture and RecreationNZ$64, 631 mNZ$69,631 m NZ$
Primary Allocation
High PerformanceNZ$58,192 mNZ$62,192 m NZ$62,192 m
Sports Anti DopingNZ$2,239 mNZ$3,239 m NZ$3,239 m
Prime Minister's Sport ScholarshipsNZ$4,250 mNZ$4,250 m NZ$4,250 m

[Source: Sport and Recreation - Treasury Estimates of Appropriations 2017/18]

Funding to NSO's

Table 4: HPSNZ High Performance Programme Investment to NSO's 2013-2016 (updated Jan 2015)

Sports20132014201520162017 
Tier 1 Targeted * 
CyclingNZ$3.9mNZ$4.3mNZ$4.6mNZ$4.7NZ$4.2
RowingNZ$4.6mNZ$4.8mNZ$5.115mNZ$5.3mNZ$5.1
SailingNZ$2.8mNZ$2.8mNZ$3.4mNZ$3.45mNZ$3.7
 Athletics Z$1.9mNZ$2.05mNZ$2.150mNZ$2.225mNZ$2.6
Tier 2 Targeted * 
EquestrianNZ$1.8mNZ$2.05mNZ$1.8mNZ$1.8mNZ$1.8
Rugby 7's (Men)NZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$0.9m
NetballNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2m
Rugby 7's (Women)NZ$800,000NZ$900,000NZ$1.0mNZ$1.0mNZ$1.1m
Canoeing (Sprint)NZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.2mNZ$1.275m NZ$1.6 m
Tier 3 Targeted 
Snow Sports NZ$1.815mNZ$1.7mNZ$1.6mNZ$1.875mNZ$2.050m 
Hockey (Women)NZ$1.3mNZ$1.3mNZ$1.3mNZ$1.3mNZ$1.35m
Targeted Other 
Paralympics NZNZ$1.4mNZ$1.7mNZ$1.9mNZ$2.155mNZ$2.4m
NZ Olympic CommitteeNZ$450,000  NZ$450,000NZ$450,000NZ$700,000 NZ$750,000 
Campaign 
SwimmingNZ$1.4mNZ$1.5mNZ$1.4mNZ$1.3mNZ$900,000
Triathlon NZ$1.4mNZ$1.4m NZ$1.25mNZ$1.25m NZ$0.75m 
Football (Women)NZ$800,000NZ$950,000NZ$950,000NZ$800,000NZ$500,000
Hockey (Men)NZ$800,000NZ$1mNZ$750,000NZ$700,000NZ$700,000
CricketNZ$400,000NZ$500,000NZ$500,000NZ$500,000NZ$500,000
Rugby LeagueNZ$400,000NZ$350,000NZ$350,000NZ$400,000NZ$500,000
BowlsNZ$300,000NZ$280,000NZ$225,000NZ$250,000NZ$250,000
SquashNZ$275,000NZ$275,000NZ$175,000NZ$175,000NZ$175,000
Softball (Men)NZ$230,000NZ$250,000NZ$250,000NZ$250,000NZ$250,000
 Softball (Women)   0NZ$150,000
Surf Life SavingNZ$150,000NZ$180,000NZ$170,000NZ$190,000NZ$225,000
GolfNZ$185,000NZ$185,0000NZ$25,000 0
Canoeing (Slalom)NZ$135,000NZ$218,000NZ$198,000NZ$175,000NZ$450,000
BoxingNZ$90,000NZ$119,000NZ$80,000 (Men only)NZ$65,000NZ$15,000
TaekwondoNZ$17,000NZ$18,000000
Basketball0NZ$200,000NZ$200,000NZ$200,000NZ$125,000
Weightlifting0NZ$64,000NZ$25,000NZ$25,000NZ$20,000
Shooting0NZ$81,000000
University Games NZ$50,0000NZ$50,0000 
Judo00NZ$25,000NZ$25,0000

Gymsports/Trampoline (Specific athlete)

00

NZ$25,000

NZ$25,000NZ$115,000
Ice Sports inc SkeletonNZ$12,500NZ$12,5000NZ$25,000 
SurfingNZ$20,000000NZ$10,000
 Beach Volleyball    0NZ$10,000
 Wrestling    NZ$15,000NZ$10,000
* Tier 1 and 2 Sports are funded for the Olympic cycle 2013-2016.

Direct athlete assistance  

Table 5: Performance Enhancement Grants Programme Guidelines

Category Amount
Individual Olympic Gold medallist $60,000
Individual Olympic medallist $55,000
4th - 6th at Olympics $47,500
7th - 8th at Olympics $40,000 
9th - 12th at Olympics $30,000
13th - 16th at Olympics $25,000
Team Olympic Gold Medallist $35,000
Team Olympic Medallist $30,000
Team Olympic 4th - 8th $25,000
Non-Olympic Individual Medallist $25,000
Non-Olympic Team Medallist $25,000

High performance centres 

  • Auckland - HPSNZ National Training Centre at AUT Millennium – includes access to pool and track
  • Cambridge - Avantidrome, national cycling centre of excellence
  • Lake Karapiro - Rowing high performance centre
  • Wellington - HPSNZ Training Centre
  • Apollo Projects Centre - Christchurch
  • Dunedin - HPSNZ Training Centre – Forsyth Barr Stadium
  • Wanaka - HPSNZ Training Centre   


Results and statistics - New Zealand

Olympic Games Medal Reports -  Podium and Top 8 Placings (Infostrada)

Table 6: Summer Olympic Games (2000-2016) Medal Analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

46th 24th 25th 15th 19th

Medals

Gold - 1
Silver - 0
Bronze - 3
Total - 4

Gold - 3
Silver - 2
Bronze - 0
Total - 5

Gold - 3
Silver - 2
Bronze - 4
Total - 9

Gold - 6
Silver - 2
Bronze - 5
Total - 13

Gold - 4
Silver - 9
Bronze - 5
Total - 18

Number of sport medals won

3 4 5 6 8

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

1 1 2 3 4
Athletics - - 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 0 - 1 - 3 = 4
Canoeing - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 1 - 1 = 3
Cycling -

1 - 0 - 0 = 1

0 - 1 - 1 = 2 0 - 1 - 2 = 3 0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Equestrian 0 - 0 - 1 = 1

-

- 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 -
Golf  n/a n/a n/a n/a 0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Rowing

1 - 0 - 0 = 1 

1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 0 - 2 = 3 3 - 0 - 2 = 5 2 - 1 - 0 = 3
Rugby Sevens n/a  n/a  n/a n/a 0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Sailing  0 - 0 - 2 = 2 - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 1 - 2 - 1 = 4
Shooting - - - - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Swimming - - -
Triathlon - 1- 1 - 0 = 2 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 - -

n/a - not on Olympic program 

New Zealand has not won any medals at the Winter Olympic Games (2002-2014).  

Summer Paralympic Games Medal Reports - Podium and Top 8 Placings (Infostrada)

Table 7: Summer Paralympic Games (2000-2016) Medal Analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

25th 26th 24th 21st  13th

Medals

Gold - 6
Silver - 8
Bronze - 4
Total - 18

Gold -6
Silver - 1
Bronze - 3
Total - 10

Gold - 5
Silver - 3
Bronze - 4
Total - 12

Gold - 6
Silver - 7
Bronze - 4 
Total - 17

Gold - 9
Silver - 5
Bronze - 7 
Total - 21

No. sports medalled in

5 6 4 3  3

No. multi-medal sports

4 1 2 2  3
Athletics 4 - 4 - 2 = 10 4 - 0 - 1 = 5

0 - 1 - 0 = 1 

-  3 - 2 - 4 = 9
Boccia - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1  - -  -
Cycling 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 1 - 0 - 3 = 4 1 - 1 - 2 = 4  0 - 1 - 1 = 2
Equestrian 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 - - -  -
Shooting - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 0 - 0 - 1 = 1  0 - 0 - 1 = 1  -
Swimming 1 - 2 - 1 = 4 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 4 - 2 - 0 = 6 5 - 6 - 1 = 12  6 - 2 - 2 = 10
Wheelchair rugby 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  - -  -
 
Table 8: Winter Paralympic Games (2002-2014) Medal Analysis
 
Salt Lake 2002 Torino 2006 Vancouver 2010

Sochi   2014

Gold medal rank

10 - 15 10

Medals

Gold - 4 
Silver - 0
Bronze - 2
Total - 6

Gold - 0
Silver - 0
Bronze -0
Total - 0

Gold - 1
Silver - 0
Bronze - 0
Total - 1

Gold - 1
Silver - 3
Bronze - 2
Total - 6

Number of sport medals won

0 0 1 2

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

0 0 1 1
Alpine skiing 4 - 0 - 2 = 6 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  0 - 1 - 0 = 1


Participation

  • No information collated

Competitive Intelligence

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International networking

  • The ASC's principal sport information contact on the ground in New Zealand is Grant McLean, Principal Advisor Research, SPARC. 

Results analysis

  • Detailed sports reports pending

System strengths

  • New Zealand in recent years has performed strongly in a small number of sports due to its targeted funding approach (for example: New Zealand rowers won 5 medals – 3 gold and 2 bronze medals at the 2012 London Olympic Games). 
  • New Zealand’s leading high performance sports appears to becoming increasingly competitive since the establishment of HPSNZ – as evidenced with recent international performances in Rowing, Cycling and Sailing.
  • New Zealand operates one of the most efficient high performance systems given its relatively small population base and funding levels.  New Zealand finished 15th on the medal tally at the 2012 London Olympic Games.
  • HPSNZ directs and funds several high performance training centres which deliver world class training facilities and daily training environment services.
  • The New Zealand high performance system employs leading international coaches, administrators and sport science/medicine practitioners – a significant number of Australians work in the system.
  • Due to its close proximity to Australia, many New Zealand athletes and sports teams compete in Australian domestic leagues and major competitions.
  • There is strong investment in athlete support in terms of both financial and education assistance when compared with other competing nations.
  • A good environment and climate to support sports such as rowing, cycling, canoeing, sailing, athletics and some winter sports.

System weaknesses

  • A limited critical mass of athletes in many sports due to New Zealand’s relatively small population. 
  • Professional non-Olympic sports such as rugby union, rugby league, cricket and netball compete for and significantly reduce the potential athlete talent base of Olympic sports.
  • A heavy reliance on public government funding.
  • Paralympic funding levels are low and performances in terms of medal yields are poor when compared with Olympic performances.
  • Limited sports science and technology research with a greater dependency on university led research.
  • An element of competition and political tension exists between HPSNZ and Sport NZ – particularly around the allocation of resources.

Relevance to Australian Environment

  • Like the investment model implemented by the ASC/AIS, HPSNZ operates targeted approach to sports funding – however, it is much more focused with only three sports receive the maximum ‘Tier 1’ funding level.
  • The three HPSNZ ‘Tier 1’ sports (Cycling, Rowing, and Sailing) compete directly with Australia’s Winning Edge ‘Foundation 1’ level funded sports of Cycling, Rowing and Sailing.
  • Like Australia, HPSNZ ‘Tier 1’ and ‘Tier 2’ sports are funded consistently for the four year Olympic cycle (2013 to 2016).
  • HSPNZ has a high level of influence and control over all elements of the national high performance sector, particularly for Olympic and Paralympic sports as local governments play a limited role. It does not have the same level of negotiation relating to system alignment required by the Australian system. 
  • HSPNZ has established and funds a number of nationally managed world class training centres including two sport specific centres dedicated to the sports of rowing and cycling. This provides direct influence over the operations in line with national priorities.
  • HPSNZ provides a large percentage of its budget to direct athlete assistance.
  • A significant number leading Australian and New Zealand coaches, administrators, and sport science/medicine practitioners transition employment between the two systems.
  • The potential for Australia to collaborate more closely with New Zealand in areas of common interest has not been fully realised or exploited to date – that is, when compared with the level of collaboration that exists between neighbouring and competing European nations.
Miscellaneous information resources

Please note - End of secure web page section


Further resources and reading

Websites

Articles

  • New Zealand by G. Dickson and M. Naylor In Comparative sport development : systems, participation and public policy. ed. K. Petry and K. Hallmann, New York, Springer, 2013 , 237-251

Resources

Videos

 



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