Netherlands

 

Prepared by: Greg Blood, Emeritus Researcher, Australian Institute of Sport (September 2014)
Updated by: Gavin Reynolds, Director, Clearinghouse for Sport, Australian Sports Commission (July 2016)
Reviewed by: International Association for Sports Information (IASI)                                                                                                                      
Scheduled release: August 2016

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Introduction

The Netherlands first sent athletes to the Olympic Games in 1900, and has participated in almost all Games since then. In 1956, the nation boycotted the Games in Melbourne as a protest against the Soviet invasion in Hungary just a few weeks before the beginning of the Games (although, one Dutch rider competed in the 1956 equestrian events, held in Stockholm a few months before the rest of the Games). (Wikipedia 2016)

Netherlands has the aim of being a top ten Olympic and Paralympic nation

Table 1 :

Population GDP

Summer Olympic Ranking

2016

Winter Olympic Ranking

2014

Summer Paralympic Ranking

2012

Winter Paralympic Ranking

2014 

16.73 million 50,793.14 USD (2013) 11th 5th 7th 14th

 


Sport Structure and Governance

Government 

Structure

  • Netherlands
  • Nationaal Olympisch Comité*Nederlands Sport Federatie (NOC*NSF)” – National Olympic Committee*Netherlands Sport federation merged in 1993. It unites the interests of more than 4 million athletes who are organised into associations. More than 90 sport federations, together representing 27,000 clubs, are affiliated to it.
  • The Netherlands Federal Government sport policy has three priority focus areas including: (1) to increase sport participation from the current level of 65% of the population to 75%; (2) to become a Top-10 Olympic nation; and, (3) to increase the capacity of club sports (5 key areas – organisational strengthening, strategic development, human resources, connecting people and knowledge management).
  •  While sports programs are delivered through schools, community groups, and commercial organisations, the majority of sports programs are organised through a network of local sports clubs, approximately 27,000 representing 75-90 National Sports Federations (NSFs).
  • The national sport policy is the responsibility of the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport [Volksgezondheid, Welzijn en Sport] (VWS).
  • The 12 Dutch provincial governments are responsible for regional planning and fund quasi-autonomous non-governmental provincial sport councils, which provide assistance to sport clubs and other sport providers at the local level.
  • At the local government level, the 443 municipalities (or councils) account for 87% of public spending on sport, mainly for the construction and financial management of sports facilities and venues.

Funding to Sport

Table 2 : Government Expenditure for Sport

Organisation Year 

Total

Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport 2016 128, 813 m

2016 Budget Government Expenditure - Participation and Physical Activity - €79,648 m ; Excellence in Sport (High Performance) - €39,513 m ; Innovation & Knowledge - €9,652 m.  

[Source:Beleidsartikel 6 Sport en bewegen]


High Performance System

High Performance Organisations

Performance Targets

  • Netherlands has the ambition of being a top 10 Olympic nation.

Funding to High Performance Sport 

  • Government expenditure to elite sport for 2016 - €39, 513 m 
  • About € 2.5 million (Euro Dollars) is allocated to ‘sport for disabled’ persons. 

Specific Sports Funding

Table 3 : Summer Olympic Sports

Sport Category Year - 2014
 Archery  Potential €285,000
 Athletics

 Potential

Potential - Multi events

Potential - Sprints

€166,250

€380,000

€285,000

 Basketball  Talent - Women  €237,500
 Boxing  Potential - Women  €85,500
 Cycling

 Podium - Women's Road

Talent - Men Road

Potentail - Track

Potential - BMX

Talent - Mountain Bike

€332,500

€95,000

€598,500

€541,500

€ 190,000

Equestrian

Podium - Show Jumping

Podium - Dressage

Podium - Eventing

€446,500

€432,250

€185,250

Fencing  Potential €85,500
Football

 Potential - Men

Talent - Women

€285,000

€285,000

Golf  Talent €294,500
Gymnastics

Potential - Men

Talent - Women

€475,000 

€285,000

Handball Potential - Women  €394,250
Hockey

Podium - Women

Podium - Men

€674,500

€608,000

Judo Podium €1,425,000
Rowing Podium €1,330,000 
Rugby Sevens  Potential - Women €332,500 
Sailing Podium €1,710,000
Swimming Podium €1,615,000
Tennis  Talent €403,750 
Triathlon  Potential €285,000
Volleyball

Potential - Beach

Potential - Women

Talent - Men

€622,250

€475,000

€237,500

Water Polo Potential - Women €617,500

 Table 4 : Winter Olympic Sports

Sport Category Year - 2013
Biathlon Talent €54,689
Bobsleigh/Skeleton Potential €301,593
Skating Podium €509,675
Ski Jumping  Talent  €79,397
Short Track Skating Potential €445,998
Snowboard

Potential

Potential - Women

Potential - Cross

€301,593

€180,451

€114.920

 Table 5 : Paralympic Sports - Summer and Winter

Sport Category Year - 2014
 Archery Potential € 55,670
 Athletics  Podium € 351,880
Basketball (Wheelchair) Podium €278,350
Boccia Potential €79,572
Cycling  Podium € 296,970
Equestrian - Dressage  Podium €100,890
Football (CP) Potential €75,164
Sailing Podium €201,780
 Skiing  Podium €164,200
Swimming Podium €353,780
Table Tennis Podium €218,690
Tennis (Wheelchair) Podium €218,690
Triathlon Potential €55,670

Operating Approach

  •  Elite sports are divided into five groups, based upon their prospects of contributing to a ‘top 10’ finish in the Olympic medal count.
  • The NOC and NSF believe that more centralised control of elite sport will be most effective. The NOC/NSF has a great deal of autonomy in determining how elite sports funding is allocated.
  • The government funds the development of successful sports products through the InnoSport Foundation, established by NOC/NSF and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO).
  • The government provides funding to the NOC/NSF for events in which the Netherlands could demonstrate its capacity for organising premier sporting events; increase its international prestige; stimulate the regional or national economy; and have demonstrable societal value.
  • Four training and education facilities for high performance sport (CTOs) located in Eindhoven (specialising in swimming), Heerenveen, Papendal, and Amsterdam (talent development).
  • A partnership agreement between NSOs and 29 secondary schools supports potential elite athletes during their school years; this is the National Organisation for Education and Top-Class Sport Council (LOOT).
  • The ‘Impulse for community schools, sport and culture’ project is jointly funded by central government and local authorities. The project helps to employ over 1,000 school-sport liaison officers, who are professionals working for sports associations and also in the education or culture sector. One of their main tasks is to establish contacts between sports clubs and schools, for example by arranging for sports clubs to give sports lessons at school.
  • Funding for coaching/technical leadership, training and competitions, sports science and sport medical support, is distributed through the NOC/NSF.

Direct Athlete Assistance 

 Elite athletes who compete at international level – i.e. holding ‘A status’ or high potential (HP) status, and who earn below the gross minimum wage, may be eligible for a personal allowance. This allowance supplements living expenses to allow them to devote time to their sport. Almost 350 elite athletes are currently receiving a personal allowance.

NOC*NSF  has set itself a target of finding find 100 permanent workplaces for (former) top
athletes in 2012.This job-finding effort is called Gold on the Workfloor and is an initiative by NOC*NSF, the
employment-services provider Randstad and Sport & Business.

High Performance Centres

 Table 6 : High Performance Centres

Name Sports
 Olympic Training Centre Papendal Archery, Athletics, Basketball, Boxing, Bobsleigh, Equestrian, Handball, Table Tennis, Volleyball
 High Performance Centre Eindhoven (Centrum voor Topsport en Onderwijs Eindhoven)  Equestrian, Gymnastics, Swimming, Volleyball,
 Center for Elite Sports and Education (CTO Amsterdam) Women's rugby, Swimming, Women's Vollreyball, Rowing, Baseball  
 Center for Elite Sports Heerenveen (CTO Heerenveen)  Gymnastics, Speed Skating, Swimming, Judo

 


Talent Development   

Top Sports Talent Schools are supported NOC/NSF . There are 30 secondary schools across the Netherlands.


Sports Science, Medicine and Technology  

InnoSport Foundation, established by NOC*NSF and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO).Besides the main office in Papendal, InnoSport port has five InnoSportLabs  - Den Bosch
(gymnastics), Den Haag (sailing), Heerenveen (speed skating) and on two locations in Eindhoven (swimming and sport stimulation). The sports labs are where the sports sector, universities and the private sector work together on new projects. For instance, at De Tongelreep national swimming centre in Eindhoven, research is being conducted into ways of enhancing the performance of Dutch swimmers.  

 

Results and Statistics

Olympic Games Medal Reports -  Podium and Top 8 Placings (Infostrada)

Table 7 : Summer Olympic Games 2000-2016 Medal Analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

11 17 12 13  11th

Medals

Gold -12
Silver - 9
Bronze - 4
Total - 25

Gold - 4
Silver - 9
Bronze - 9
Total - 22

Gold - 7
Silver - 5
Bronze - 4  
Total - 16

Gold - 6
Silver - 6
Bronze - 8  
Total - 20
 Gold - 8
Silver - 7
Bronze - 4  
Total - 19

No. sports medalled in

9

7 8 8  10

No. multi-medal sports

5 5 5 6  4
Archery 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 - - -  -
Athletics  -  -  -  -  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Badminton - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - -  -
Boxing  -  -  -  -  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Cycling 3 - 1 - 0 = 4 1 - 1 - 2 = 4 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 0 - 2 = 3  2 - 3 - 1 = 6
Equestrian 2 - 2 - 0 = 4 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 0 - 3 - 1 = 4  -
Gymnastics - - - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  1 - 0 - 0 = 1
Hockey 1 - 0 - 1 = 2 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 1 -0 = 2  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Judo 1 - 0 -0 = 1 0 - 1 - 3 = 4 0 - 1 - 4 = 5 0 - 0 - 2 = 2  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Rowing 0 - 3 - 0 = 3 0 - 1 - 2 = 3 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 0 - 0 - 1 = 1  1 - 1 - 1 = 3
Sailing 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 1 - 1 - 1 = 3  2 - 0 - 0 = 2
Swimming 5 - 1 - 2 = 8 2 - 3 - 2 = 7 2 - 0 - 0 = 2 2 - 1 - 1 = 4  2 - 0 - 0 = 2
Tennis 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - - -  -
Volleyball - - - -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Water Polo - - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 -  

Table 8 : Winter Olympic Games 2002-2014 Medal Analysis

Salt Lake 2002 Torino 2006 Vancouver 2010

Sochi   2014

Gold medal rank

9 10 10 5

Medals

Gold -3
Silver - 0
Bronze - 5  Total - 8

Gold -3
Silver - 2
Bronze - 4
Total - 9

Gold - 4
Silver - 1
Bronze -3 Total - 8

Gold - 8
Silver -7
Bronze - 9
Total -24

Number of sport medals won

1

 1 

2 2

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

 0

 0

1 1
 Short track skating  -  -  - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1
 Snowboarding - - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  -
 Speedskating 3 - 5 - 0 = 8  3 - 2 - 4 = 9  3 - 1 - 3 = 7   8 - 7 - 8 = 23

 Paralympic Games Medal Reports -  Podium and Top 8 Placings (Infostrada)

Table 9 : Summer Paralympic Games 2000-2016 Medal Analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

15th 27th 19th 10th  7th

Medals

Gold - 12
Silver - 9
Bronze - 9
Total - 30

Gold - 5
Silver -12
Bronze - 12
Total - 29
Gold -5
Silver - 10
Bronze - 7
Total - 22

Gold - 10 
Silver - 10
Bronze - 19 
Total - 39 

 Gold - 17 
Silver - 19
Bronze - 26 
Total - 62 

No. sports medalled in

8 8 6 8  10

No. multi-medal sports

5 6 5 7  7
Archery - - - -  -
Athletics 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 1 - 5 - 1 = 7

1 - 2 - 0 = 3 

1 - 4 - 2 = 7  3 - 1 - 3 = 7
Basketball (Wheelchair) 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Boccia - - - -  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Cycling 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 0 - 3 - 0 = 3 1 - 2 - 3 = 6  5 - 5 - 6 = 16
Equestrian 1 - 2 - 1 = 4 0 - 1 - 2 = 3  - 0 - 0 - 2 = 2  1 - 2 - 4 = 7
 Football 7-a-side -  - -  -  -
Judo - - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 -  -
Powerlifting 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 - - -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Rowing n/a n/a - -  -
Sailing - 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 - 1 - 0 - 1 = 2  -
Shooting - - - -  -
Swimming 7 - 2 - 5 = 14 0 - 2 - 5 = 7 2 - 2 - 2 = 6  4 - 2 - 7 = 13  4 - 6 - 11 = 21
Table tennis 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 0 - 0 - 2 = 2  1 - 0 - 1 = 2  1 - 1 - 0 = 1
Tennis (Wheelchair) 3 - 1 - 1 = 5 3 - 1 - 2 = 6 2- 3 - 1 = 6 2 - 2 - 2 = 6  2 - 2 - 0 = 4
Triathlon  n/a  n/a  n/a  n/a  1 - 1 - 0 = 2
Volleyball (Sitting)  -  0 - 1 - 0 = 1   0 - 0 - 1 = 1 -  -

Table 10 : Winter  Paralympic Games 2002-2014 Medal Analysis 

Salt Lake 2002 Torino 2006 Vancouver 2010

Sochi   2014

Gold medal rank

15 - - 14

Medals

Gold -1    Silver - 3
Bronze - 0 Total -4

Gold -
Silver -
Bronze -
Total -

Gold -
Silver -
Bronze -
Total -

Gold - 1
Silver - 0
Bronze - 0
Total - 1

Number of sport medals won

2 0 0 1

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

0
 Alpine skiing  0 - 0 - 0 = 0  0 - 0 - 0 = 0  0 - 0 - 0 = 0   1 - 0 - 0 = 0
 Biathlon  1 - 0 - 0 = 1  0 - 0 - 0 = 0  0 - 0 - 0 = 0   0 - 0 - 0 = 0
 Cross country skiing  0 - 3 - 0 = 3  0 - 0 - 0 = 0  0 - 0 - 0 = 0   0 - 0 - 0 = 0


 


Participation

The proportion of the Dutch public who perform sport on a regular basis is about 65%. The aim is to boost public sport participation to a level of 75% in the coming years. The better part of organised sport in the Netherlands is formed by the sport clubs at local level. The Netherlands is a country with a strong sport club culture. No fewer than 27,000 sport clubs with 5.7 million members can be found here. They account for almost a third of the population.


Competitive Intelligence

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International networking


Results analysis


System strengths


System weaknesses

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Relevance to Australian Environment


Other observations


Miscellaneous information resources


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Resources

Websites

Articles

  • Netherlands by R. Hoekmann and K. Breedceld In Comparative sport development : systems, participation and public policy. ed. K. Petry and K. Hallmann, New York, Springer, 2013 , 119-134    

Videos

 



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