Germany

German Flag

 

Prepared by: Greg Blood, Emeritus Researcher, Australian Institute of Sport (June 2014)
Updated by: Greg Blood (September 2016)
Reviewed by: International Association for Sports Information (IASI)
Scheduled release: June 2015

The information presented below is regularly reviewed and updated. Your feedback and input is encouraged and appreciated to help ensure the currency and accuracy of the information provided. If you would like to suggest a resource, submit content or provide feedback regarding this portfolio of information, please contact us.

Please refer to the Clearinghouse for Sport Disclaimer page for more information concerning this content. 


Index of content:


 

Additional information covering this topic may be restricted due to a number of reasons including adherence to commercial in-confidence, licensing and/or copyright obligations. Clearinghouse members should check to see that they are logged onto the website.

Please contact us if you are experiencing any difficulty accessing the Clearinghouse information resources that you require.



Introduction

Germany has consistently performed well as a nation at recent Summer Olympic Games (1996-2012) finishing between 3rd and 6th on the official International Olympic Committee (IOC) medal tally, and between 8th and 11th (2000-2012) on the official International Paralympic Committee (IPC) medal tally. Germany is also one of the top performing nations at Winter Olympic and Winter Paralympic Games.

The German Olympic Sports Confederation (DOSB), forecasts that Germany is likely to win between 40 to 70 Olympic medals in Rio 2016. Germany competes strongly with Australia for medals in a number of Olympic sports including track cycling, hockey (field), canoeing/kayaking, equestrian, diving, sailing and swimming.

Germany shares a similar national sport structure and high performance system to Australia. However, a few notable differences exist including the role Germany’s military, border control, and police services play in employing and supporting their elite and emerging elite level athletes. Also, part of Germany’s sports funding base is derived from a national lottery.

The German sport system is currently subject to a wide-sweeping Federal Government review which is due to report its findings in late 2016.

Table 1: Key national performance metrics - Germany

Population Annual Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Summer Olympic
Gold Medal Ranking (2016)

Winter Olympic 
Gold Medal Ranking (2014)
Summer Paralympic Gold Medal Ranking (2016) Winter Paralympic Gold Medal Ranking (2014)
82 million $3.428 trillion (2012 nominal) 5th 6th 6th 2nd

 


Sport structure and governance

Government 

Sport in Germany is autonomous. The German government acts upon the principle of subsidiarity - i.e. the principle that a central authority should only perform those tasks which cannot be performed at a more local level.

The German Government allocates funding directly to the German Olympic Sports Confederation (DOSB), national sports governing bodies (NGBs), high performance training centres and sports academies/schools, sports infrastructure and facilities development, sport science organisations, disability sport and other sport community initiatives.

Structure 

  • Diagram of German Sports System
  • German Sport System - Sportsysteme in Europa Member State Profiles
  • A federated system - national, provincial and local governments and organisations
  • The peak Federal Government agency responsible for sport is the Bundesministenum des Innern [Federal Ministry of the Interior]. The Ministry funds NGBs based on independent advice provided by the DOSB.
  • There are over 91,000 sports clubs with 27.8 million members.
  • The DOSB is the central organisation of 16 regional sports confederations (one in each provincial region or state), 62 national (sport-governing) federations and 20 sport associations with particular tasks.

Sport development and community sport

In addition to its high performance sport leadership role, the DOSB supports 'mass sport' (or community sport) programs. It's role is very similar to that of the Australian Sports Commission (ASC). The DOSB lead a number of major community sport initiatives including a national coach/trainer accreditation scheme, a number of sport related community inclusion programs, and a broad range of international sport for development projects.

The Deutsche Sportjugend (SDJ) [The German Sports Youth] represents the interests of more than 10 million children and youth up to 27 years of age who are organised in over 91,000 sports clubs nationally.  


High performance system 

High Performance Organisations 

  • Bundesministenum des Innern [Federal Ministry of the Interior] - the peak Federal Government agency responsible for allocating public funds to sport including NFs, high performance training centres, research institutions, sports facilities and infrastructure development, and to other sport related agencies and Government policy initiatives.
  • Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund (DOSB) [German Olympic Sports Confederation] - the German National Olympic Committee responsible for providing funding advice on sport to German governments at all levels, and for providing advocacy and oversight of all recognised national sports including non-Olympic sports.
  • Deutsche Behindertensportverband e.V (DSB) National Paralympic Committee Germany.
  • Der Deutsche Gehörlosen-Sportverband (DGS) [German Deaf Sports].
  • Organisierten Gehörlosensports Deutschlands – works closely with the DSB.
  • Stiftung_Deutsche_Sporthilfe [German Sports Aid Foundation] – responsible for administering financial assistance to podium potential athletes.
  • Landessportbund [a federated group of non-government agencies based in each German constituent state responsible for administering elite junior sport].
  • Bundesinstitut für Sportwissenschaft (BISp) [Federal Institute of Sport Science] – responsible for controlling and administering Government funding for sport science and research grants.
  • Institut für Angewandte Trainingswissenschaft (IAT) [German Institute for Applied Training Sciences] – responsible for providing sport science, medicine and information support services to Olympic/Paralympic NF administrators, coaches, support staff and athletes.
  • Institut for Forschung und Entwicklung von Sportgeraeten (FES) [Institute for Research and Development of Sport Equipment] – specialises in researching and developing cutting-edge sport equipment engineering and technology solutions for Olympic and Paralympic athletes.
  • Nationale Anti Doping Agentur Deutschland (NADA) [German National Anti-Doping Agency].

High Performance Summary

  • Sport in Germany is autonomous.
  • The German Federal Government acts upon the principle of subsidiarity—i.e. the principle that a central authority should only perform those tasks which cannot be performed at a more local level.
  • The high performance sport system is principally funded by the Federal Government using a targeted and performance based investment approach.
  • Advice to Federal Government concerning funding allocations to national sporting federations (NFs) is provided by the Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund (DOSB) [German Olympic Sports Confederation].
  • Funding to Olympic NFs is targeted and allocated on a performance or results basis. NFs submit to review by the DOSB and apply for Federal funding based on their past and prospective performances at designated benchmark events.
  • Approximately 3,800 elite and emerging elite athletes receive financial assistance (between 1.500 € and 100 € per month).
  • A further 1047 athletes are employed by German military or law enforcement agencies (where generous employment conditions allow for training and competition attendance).
  • Junior sport (including elite junior sport) is principally funded by the sixteen German constituent state governments and administered through their respective regional sport, Landessportbund [non-government peak regional sport bodies].

Performance Targets

  • The DOSB forecasts Germany will win between 40 to 70 Olympic medals at Rio 2016, and will finish amongst the top five competing nations on the official International Olympic Committee (IOC) medal tally.  In April 2016, Michael Vespers, Germany's Head of Mission for the 2016 Olympic Games updated the target range and moved it down to between 38 and 68 medals. 
  • The DOSB’s previous forecast for London 2012 was 45 to 86 medals. The actual result was 44 medals, finishing 6th on the official medal tally.
  • Targets for the 2016 Paralympic Games are not available

Funding to high performance sport  

Table 2: German federal high performance sport funding agencies including annual allocations

Organisation 2015  Breakdown of Income
Bundesministenum des Innern (Ministry of the Interior) €130 million  
Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund (DOSB) €38 million €21.2 Govt, €6m Lottery, €4 Members Fees, €7.7 Marketing 
Bundesministerium der Verteidigung (Ministry of Defence) €30 million  
[Source:German Olympic Sports Confederation by Wissenschaftliche Dienste, 2016]

Deutsche Sportlotterie [German Sport Lottery]

The ‘German Sport Lottery’ was established in 2014-15 to improve the financial support provided to emerging and current German national level athletes. Unlike other national lotteries around the world that only disburse a percentage of their overall royalties to sport, the German Sport Lottery is solely dedicated to funding high performance sport athletes. There are no direct athlete funding figures available at this time given this is a new initiative. However, a projected breakdown of lottery revenues includes:

  • 30.00% direct athlete support (to supplement existing German Sports Aid Foundation (DSH) financial assistance to approximately 3,800 elite, emerging elite and sub-elite athletes. Further detail about DSH is provided below)
  • 16.67% lottery tax 
  • 22.07% administration
  • 31.26% lottery winnings

Funded Sports and Performance Targets

Table 3: List of funded sports, funding category and medal forecasts (funding categories described in Table 4)

Sport Category  No. of Medals
(2016)
Places 1-8
(2016)

Rio
(2013-2016)

Archery D 0  1-2 **
Athletics A 4-6  18-20 €5,706,400
Badminton C 0-1  2-4 €627,700
Basketball

D - Men
E - Women

0
0

 1 €496,000

Boxing

C 1-3  3-5 €862,300
Canoeing

A - Sprint
B - Slalom

2
6

 4
9-12

€2,388,095
Cycling

A - Track
B - Road
B - MTB
D - BMX

4-6
1-2
0-1
0

 14-16
10
1-2
3-4

€2,449,750
Diving C 1-2  10-12 *
Equestrian A     €1,477,000
Fencing B 2-3 7 €1,838,900
Football C - Women  2 2  -
Golf E 0  0  -
Gymnastics

B - Artistic
D - Trampoline, RSG

    €1,819,900
Handball D 0  2 €421,100
Hockey

A - Men
D - Women

0-1  2 €1,569,850
Judo A 3-4  5-7 €1,274,550
Modern Pentathlon D 0  2 €441,575
Rowing A 2-4  10-14 €3,243,350
Rugby E 0  0  €222,900
Sailing C 2  4-6 €963,450
Shooting C 2-3  7-10 €1,762,700**
Swimming C 2-5  10-12 €3,719,900 *
Syncro Swimming E 0  0  *
Taekwondo B 0-1  1-2 €606,100
Table Tennis B 1-2  3 €856,500
Tennis C 1-2  1-2  -
Triathlon 0-1  2 €533,800
Volleyball

B - Beach
D - Indoor

0-1
0

2
2

 €1,151,855
Water Polo

D - Men
E - Women

0
0

1
0

*
Weightlifting C 0-1 2 €733,050
Wrestling C 1-2 3-4 €1,063,750
Total 40-70  152-183

€36,229,675 

* Swimming budget includes diving, water polo and synchronised swimming
** Shooting budget includes archery

[Source: Annual allocation to funded sports for 2013-2016 and Specific Sports Income Per Year 2013-2016 (PDF PDF document - 207.0 KB)] 

Operating Approach

  • A whole of system review is currently in progress with report scheduled for July 2016.
  • The DOSB prioritises and determines the Federal Government’s investment strategies and funding allocations to all recognised NFs, including non- Olympic sports.
  • Funding to Olympic NFs is targeted and allocated on a performance basis. NFs submit to review by the DOSB and apply for funding based on their past and prospective performances at benchmark events.
  • The DOSB allocates funding over five priority funding categories (A to E).
  • NFs are allocated and guaranteed the same levels of annual funding over a quadrennial (or a four year Olympic/Paralympic) cycle (2013-2016).
  • Delivery of the high performance support and service provider network, including provision of the daily training environment (DTE), also sits outside of Government.
  • There are 19 world class Olympic high performance training centres employing coaches, sports practitioners and other DTE service providers. 
  • The high performance support network consists of both private sector and not-for-profit government funded business enterprises.
  • Leading German universities also play a role in providing support to the network.
  • There are 41 elite sports schools and over 92,000 sports clubs.
  • The extensive sports club system and its competitions form the foundation of the high performance system. 
  • The grassroots system is well organised providing athletes with multiple entry points along the pathway or continuum.
  • The Landessportbund is a federated group of agencies responsible for funding and administering elite junior sport.
  • The Landessportbund in each region across the nation is funded by its respective German constituent state government.
  • The DOSB, through the extensive German sports club system, maintains an active membership of over 28 million sports participants.

Direct athlete assistance 

  • The German Sports Aid Foundation (DSH) provides financial assistance to approximately 3,800 elite, emerging elite and sub-elite athletes. 
  • Germany’s national airline Lufthansa is a principal sponsor of the DSH and the assistance scheme.
  • There are four athlete funding assistance categories - international (800 elite athletes), national (1,200 emerging elite athletes), and junior/talented (1,800 sub elite athletes).
  • The maximum monthly athlete payment is €1500 for Olympic, Paralympic and world championship medallists ($2,170 AUD). The assistance is provided for a maximum period of 18 months before being subject to a performance review for continuation of the assistance is recommended). All payments are means tested. Support for athletes with a disability also takes into account other forms of public funded social support assistance.
  • Germany’s Armed Forces, Federal Border Police, and Customs Authority, employ and support over 1,057 athletes on (or transitioning into) the high performance pathway. In 2014 athlete placements included:
    • 744 sport soldiers in the German Army (plus an additional 80 staff administering the program);
    • 52 athletes in the German Customs Office;
    • 161 athletes in the German Border Police;
    • 100 athletes in regional police forces in four constituent states - (Thuringia (51), Hessen (34), Lower Saxony (9), Rhineland-Pfalz (4)
    • 100 athletes in regional police forces in four constituent states - (Thuringia (51), Hessen (34), Lower Saxony (9), Rhineland-Pfalz (4); and, an undefined number of athletes in regional fire brigades. 

Table 4: Sports' funding categories and assessment criteria

Category Description

No. of Athletes 

A - Team International class - Criteria are the places 1-8 in World Championships or Olympic Games as well as the places 1-6 at European Championships. 800
B - Team Athletes of national class are classified who have outgrown the C-squad, but not (yet) fulfill the conditions for the A-team 1200
C - Team Junior and young athletes and talents.  The age limit is defined specific to sport; but usually at about 18 to 19 years 1800
Boarding Promotion Young talents still in boarding and school sport schools 600

High performance centres 

List of high performance centres:

  • Olympiastützpunkt Thuringia 
  • Olympic Training Center Berlin
  • Olympic Centre Rhineland Palatinate / Saarland
  • Olympiastützpunkt Westphalia 
  • Olympic Centre Rhineland 
  • Olympiastützpunkt Bavaria 
  • Olympic Training Center Rhein-Ruhr 
  • Olympic Training Center Rhein-Neckar
  • Olympic Training Center Leipzig 
  • Olympiastützpunkt Brandenburg 
  • Olympic Training Center Freiburg, Black Forest 
  • Olympic Training Center Stuttgart 
  • Olympic Training Center Hamburg / Schleswig-Holstein 
  • Olympiastützpunkt Chemnitz / Dresden 
  • Olympic Training Center Mecklenburg-Vorpommern 
  • Olympiastützpunkt Lower Saxony 
  • Olympiastützpunkt Saxony-Anhalt
  • Olympiastützpunkt Tauberbischofsheim    

Pathway program

Significant investment and development of Germany’s elite athlete pathway has occurred in recent years resulting in the emergence of elite sports schools, and the proliferation of National Olympic Training Centres. Progression through these institutions provides the typical athlete pathway for most Olympic sports. The massive club system and its competitions are the backbone of the entire system, and provide obvious feeder points for athletes to be recruited into the high performance system at any level along the talent pathway.


Talent development  

Examples of German talent development programs:


Coaching and leadership development

 The long established DOSB 'Trainer Offensive Program' (TOP) objectives include: 

  • Expansion of the national coaching structure
  • Improving the conditions for the coaching profession
  • Greater appreciation of the coaching profession in the public domain
  • Increase the attractiveness of the coaching profession
  • Providing motivation of the young and/or developing coach

During the Olympic cycle 2009-2012, the DOSB funded 54 full-time, and subsidised a further 40, national coaching staffing positions as well as other honourary national coaches.There is a total of 800 national coaches employed by NFs and a further 4,000 working as regional coaches. 

More recently, the DOOSB has established the 'Coaching Academy' based in Cologne. The Academy provides a range of professional training and development  opportunities specifically designed for emerging and national level coaches. The primary offering is a three year course of study with 5,400 so called learning units at a cost of 9,000 € per student (which is typically paid by the NFs). Approximately 35 places are offered every year. Students undertake course work via correspondence with designated attendance periods in Cologne. The courses are facilitated by scholars from universities and by other national sport sector experts. Practical training is offered by the participating NFs. The Academy also offers a range of specialised short courses.


Sports science, medicine and technology 

Bundesinstitut für Sportwissenschaft (BISp) (Federal Institute of Sport Science) located at the Federal Interior Ministry in Bonn was established in 1970. BiSp identifies research needs and coordinates and evaluates the research. It is involved in transfer of research results into practice. It evaluates and  the projects of the Institute for Applied Training Science (IAT), and the Institute for Research and Development of Sports Equipment (FES). In December 2013, it's budget was cut by 1 million euros and it announced there would be no project application round for 2015.

Institut für Angewandte Trainingswissenschaft (IAT) [German Institute for Applied Training science] located in Leipzig and established in 1992. It is the central research institute of the German researchers and young academics performance sport. It's primary research areas include, analysing world standards, training methods, health and resilience, technology and measurement, and information systems. 24 Olympic sports have cooperation agreements. There have been long term agreements with 16 sports federations - biathlon, speed skating, canoe racing, canoe slalom, athletics, ski jumping, skeleton, diving, badminton, boxing, handball, hockey, judo, wrestling and volleyball. Funding by the Federal Ministry of the Interior of 7.1 million euros and 102 staff in 2012. [Source: website]

Institut for Forschung und Entwicklung von Sportgeraeten (FES) (Institute for Research and Development of Sport Equipment) is located in Berlin and established by socialist East Germany (GDR) in 1963. It has the simple goal  to ensure that no German Olympic athlete is ever beaten because of inferior equipment. It employs 35 engineers on the 70-person staff. Its primary emphasis is on winter sports but assists cycling, sailing, rowing and canoeing. The FES gets 90 percent of its funding, or 4.5 million euros, from the federal sport ministry. [Source: German engineering key for Winter Games success Hurriyet Daily News, (Jan 2014)]    


Results and statistics - Germany

 Olympic Games Medal Reports - Podium and Top 8 Placings (Gracenote)

Table 5: Summer Olympic Games (2000-2016) medal performance analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

5th 6th 5th 6th  5th

Medals

Gold - 13
Silver - 17
Bronze - 26
Total - 56

Gold - 13
Silver - 16
Bronze - 20
Total - 49

Gold - 16
Silver - 10
Bronze - 15
Total - 41

Gold - 11
Silver - 19
Bronze - 14
Total - 44 

 Gold - 17
Silver - 10
Bronze - 15
Total - 42

Number of sport medals won

18 16 19  13  19

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

10 12 9  9  10
Archery 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 - -  -
Athletics 2 - 1 - 2 = 5 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 1 - 4 - 3 = 8  2 - 0 - 1 = 3
Boxing 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 0 - 0 - 2 = 2 - -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Canoeing 4 - 1 - 3 = 8 4 - 4 - 1 = 9 3 - 2 - 3 = 8 3 - 2 - 3 = 8  4 - 2 - 1 = 7
Cycling 3 - 4 - 3 = 10 1 - 1 - 4 = 6 1 - 1 - 1 = 3 1 - 4 - 1 = 6  1 - 0 - 1 = 2
Diving 0 - 0 - 2 = 2 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 -  0 - 0 - 1 = 3
Equestrian 2 - 1 - 1 = 4 1 - 1 - 2 = 4 3 - 1 - 1 = 5 2 - 1 - 1 = 4  2 - 2 - 2 = 6 
Fencing 0 - 2 - 3 = 5 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 2 - 0 - 0 = 2 0 - 1 - 1 = 2  -
Football 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 -  1 - 1 - 0 = 2
Gymnastics - 1 - 0 - 1 = 2 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 0 - 3 - 0 = 3  1 - 0 - 1 = 2
Handball - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Hockey - 1 - 0 - 1 = 2 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  0 - 0 - 2 = 2
Judo 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 1 - 0 - 3 = 4 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 0 - 2 - 2 = 4  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Modern Pentathlon - - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 -  -
Rowing 2 - 1 - 3 = 6 2 - 2 - 0 = 4 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 2 - 1 - 0 = 3  2 - 1 - 0 = 3
Sailing 0 - 2 - 1 = 3 - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Shooting - 2 - 1 - 0 = 3 0 - 1 - 3 = 4 -  3 - 1 - 0 = 4
Swimming 0 - 0 - 3 = 3 0 - 1 - 4 = 5 2 - 0 - 1 = 3 0 - 1 - 0 = 1  -
Table Tennis - -

0 - 1 - 0 = 1

0 - 0 - 2 = 2  0 - 1 - 1 = 2
Tennis 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - -  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Taekwondo 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1   -
Triathlon 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 -  -
Volleyball - Beach 0 - 0 - 1 = 1 - - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  1 - 0 - 0 = 1
Weightlifting 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 -  -
Wrestling - - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 -  0 - 0 - 1 = 1

Table 6: Winter Olympic Games (2002 to 2014) medal performance analysis

Salt Lake 2002 Torino 2006 Vancouver 2010

Sochi 2014

Gold medal rank

2nd 1st 2nd 6th

Medals

Gold - 12
Silver - 16
Bronze - 8
Total - 36

Gold - 11
Silver - 12
Bronze - 6
Total - 29

Gold - 10
Silver - 13
Bronze - 7
Total - 30

Gold - 8
Silver - 6
Bronze - 5
Total - 19

Number of sport medals won

8 7 9 8

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

7 6 6 5
Alpine skiing  0 - 0 - 1 = 1    3 - 0 - 0 = 3  1 - 1 - 1 = 3
Biathlon  3 - 5 - 1 = 9  5 - 4 - 2 = 11  2 - 1 - 2 = 5  0 - 2 - 0  = 2
Bobsleigh  2 - 1 - 1 = 4  3 - 0 - 0 = 3  1 - 2 - 0 = 3  
Cross country skiing  1 - 2 - 2 = 5  0 - 3 - 1 = 4  1 - 4 - 0 = 5  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Figure skating      0 - 0 - 1 = 1  0 - 0 - 1 = 1
Luge  2 - 2 - 1 = 5  1 - 2 - 1 = 4  2 - 1 - 2 = 5  4 - 1 - 0 = 5
Nordic combined  0 - 2 - 0 = 2  1 - 1 - 1 = 3    1 - 1 - 1 = 3
Skeleton      0 - 1 - 0 = 1  
Ski jumping  1 - 1 - 0 = 1    0 - 1 - 0 = 1  2 - 0 - 0 = 2
Snowboarding    0 - 1 - 0 = 1    0 - 1 - 1 = 2
Speedskating  3 - 3 - 2 = 8  1 - 1 - 1 = 3  1 - 3 - 0 = 4  

Paralympic Games Medal Reports - Podium and Top 8 Placings (Gracenote)

Table 7: Summer Paralympic Games (2000-2016) medal analysis

Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012  Rio 2016

Gold medal rank

10th 8th 11th 8th  6th

Medals

Gold - 16
Silver - 41
Bronze - 38
Total - 95

Gold - 19
Silver - 28
Bronze - 31
Total - 78

Gold - 14
Silver - 25
Bronze - 20
Total - 59

Gold - 18
Silver - 26
Bronze - 22 
Total - 66

 Gold - 18
Silver - 25
Bronze - 14 
Total - 57

No. sports medalled in

10 8

9

13  10

No. multi-medal sports

7 6 8  7
Archery (Wheelchair) - 1 - 0 -0 = 1 - -  -
Athletics 7 - 12 - 20 = 39 4 - 11 - 9 = 24

5 - 9 - 7 = 21

5 - 3 - 10 = 18  9 - 9 - 7 = 25
Basketball (Wheelchair) - - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1 1 - 0 - 0 = 1  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Canoeing  n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a  0 - 2 - 0 = 2
Cycling 1 - 4 = 0 = 5  2 - 1 = 3 = 6 3 - 6 - 4 = 13 4 - 7 - 3 = 14  8 - 3 - 4 = 15
Equestrian -  0 - 4 - 1 = 5 3 - 1 - 2 = 6 2 - 3 - 2 = 7  0 - 1 - 1 = 2
Fencing (Wheelchair) 0 - 5 - 5 = 10 - - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1  -
Goalball - -  - -  -
Judo 0 - 0 - 1 = 1  2 - 1 - 3 = 6 0 - 1 - 1 = 2 2 - 0 - 1 = 3   0 - 2 - 1 = 3
Powerlifting 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 - - -  -
Rowing  n/a  n/a - 0 - 1 - 0 = 1  -
Sailing 1 - 1 - 0 = 2 - 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 0 - 2 - 0 = 2  -
Shooting 0 - 5 - 1 = 6 1 - 1 - 2 = 4 0 - 2 - 0 = 2 0 - 1 - 1 = 2  0 - 1 - 0 = 1
Swimming 2 - 10 - 9 = 21 5 - 8 - 10 = 23 1 - 3 - 5 = 9 2 - 7 - 3 = 12  0 - 2 - 1 = 3
Table tennis 3 - 4 - 2 = 9 4 - 2 - 3 = 9 1 - 2 - 1 = 4 2 - 1 - 1 = 4  0 - 4 - 0 = 4
Triathlon   n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a  1 - 0 - 0 = 1
Volleyball 1 - 0 - 0 = 1 - - 0 - 0 - 1 = 1  -

 n/a - not on Paralympic program 

Table 8: Winter Paralympic Games (2002-2014) medal analysis

Salt Lake 2002 Torino 2006 Vancouver 2010

Sochi 2014

Gold medal rank

1st 2nd 1st 2nd

Medals

Gold - 17
Silver - 1
Bronze - 15
Total - 33

Gold - 8
Silver - 5
Bronze - 5
Total - 18

Gold - 13
Silver - 5
Bronze - 6
Total - 24

Gold - 9
Silver - 5
Bronze - 1
Total - 15

Number of sport medals won

3 3 3 3

Number of sports two or more medal won (multi-medal)

3 3 3 2
Alpine skiing  8 - 0  6 = 14  6 - 3 - 2 = 11  7 - 4 - 4 = 15 6 - 4 - 1 = 11
Biathlon  3 - 0 - 1 = 4 1 - 1 - 2 = 4  3 - 0 - 2 = 5  2 - 1 - 0 = 3
Cross country skiing  6 - 1 - 8 = 15  1 - 1 - 1 = 3  3 - 1 - 0 = 4  1 - 0 - 0 = 1

 


Participation

  • Bundesministenum des Innern funding to participation is € 138 million (2011). 
  • One third of the population regularly participates in organised sport usually through a sport club. Slogans such as ''Sport is at its best in the club“ or ''Sport is good for Germany“ are widely known. 
  • There are more than 600 different educational curricula in which sport organisations offer club participants, volunteers, and staff. The 'DOSB General Guidelines of Education' sets the national framework and accreditation criteria for clubs education and advanced training courses.
  • Almost 500,000 persons hold a valid DOSB licence as (male or female) coaches, exercise leaders, club managers or youth leaders.
  • The 'Deutsche Sportjugend' (DSJ) [German Sports Youth] takes up and represents the interests of more than 10 million children, adolescents and young people up to 27 years of age, who are organised in over 91,000 sports clubs.


Competitive Intelligence

Secure Access: If you can see this message, you have been granted access to a highly secure section of this web page. Please manage the following information as a business in-confidence resource. All enquiries concerning permissions and access control to this information should be directed to the National Sport Information Centre/Clearinghouse for Sport, Australian Sports Commission.

The information presented within this secure section is  currently being assembled. Unless otherwise indicated, much of this content is yet to be properly evaluated and assessed for its currency and accuracy. Alerts updating users of new content additions or changes to the information provided will be posted on the ‘Performance Intelligence Network’ email distribution list (PERFORMANCE-INTELLIGENCE-NETWORK@LISTSERV.AUSPORT.GOV.AU). If you wish to be added to this network, please contact: Gavin.Reynolds@ausport.gov.au (NSIC/Clearinghouse).


References and further information resources

Websites

Resources

  • 'Sports in Germany' (PPT  - 1.5 MB) (2010), a DOSB presentation in English providing an overview of the organisation's role across the German sport system. 
  • Sports in Germany (PDF PDF document - 983.4 KB) (2009), The German Olympic Sports Confederation (DOSB)
  • Sports Development in Germany (PDF PDF document - 545.0 KB) (2009), Dr Karin Fehres, Direkorin Sportentwicklung

Reports

Articles

  • Germany by K. Petry and K. Hallmann In Comparative sport development : systems, participation and public policy. ed. K. Petry and K. Hallmann, New York, Springer, (2013), p. 75-86 
  • Germany by K. Petry, D. Steinbach and V. Burk. In Comparative elite sport development ed. B. Houlihan and M. Green. Amsterdam, Elservier, (2008), p. 115-147.  

Videos

 



Is this information complete? 

The Clearinghouse for Sport is a sector-wide knowledge sharing initiative, and as such your contributions are encouraged and appreciated. If you would like to suggest a resource, submit a publication, or provide feedback on this topic, please contact us.
Alternatively, if you would like to be kept up to date with research and information published about this topic, please request a research profile setup.